Kushiels Chosen (Kushiels Legacy Book 2)


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Give me some political fantasy any day, and I'm a happy reader. I liked Kushiel's Dart. I'm not sure if there's a definite quality improvement or if I'm going too easy on this one, but I loved Kushiel's Chosen. From this starting point, Jacqueline Carey creates a world that, while somewhat similar to our own, nevertheless has unique societies and politics. As she crisscr Screw magic. The combination of her stunning beauty, sexual promiscuity, and savvy spy skills can be very persuasive. That doesn't do justice to Carey's intricate plotting though.

To put it in perspective: Meanwhile, I guessed where Melisande was hiding long before the big reveal and I never solve those mysteries.

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To view it, click here. But then a parcel comes from Melisande Sharizhai - Phedre's sangoire cloak - and there is only one way to interpret it; Melisande's games of politic The second in the Kushiel's legacy series, continues on exactly where the first novel left off. Which only makes me wonder how far she'd have to travel in the third book in order to beat it! Another beautifully written epic fantasy. It's not a matter of her beliefs or her personality, but simply of taste:

But does this make the book bad? On the contrary, it's very smart. By choosing it to do this way, Carey divides the book into two parts that are almost self-contained narratives in themselves, with introduction, rising action, climax, and denouement. The main focus is on discovering how Melisande escaped custody at the end of Kushiel's Dart and hence, where she has gone to ground.

But it's too late, and she's imprisoned in an inescapable fortress on an island. Who lives and who dies? More importantly, how do the machinations of a D'Angeline traitor affect Serenissiman politics? Carey constantly impresses me with her ability to effortless manage so many characters. The universe of Kushiel's Legacy is very heavily populated, but not so much so that it's Name Soup.

Also, of all the exposition that Carey skips in the second book, she doesn't re-explain the nature of the Cassilines, something I had forgotten in the year that managed to elapse between books. They are each other's nemesis on both an intellectual and visceral level. If her existence as the world's only anguissette isn't conflicting enough, her attraction to Melisande is inconvenient and almost deadly.

But it's more than just mere attraction. Moreover, wherever she goes and whatever she accomplishes, she is always still "the anguissette ," identified sometimes more by myth than her own personality. The fact that she saves the kingdom and is commended by Ysandre for this at the end of the book doesn't exactly help. And so, Kushiel's Chosen takes the best aspects of Kushiel's Dart and amplifies them, grafting on a better plot with more sinister intrigue and a stellar cast of supporting characters.

In so doing, Carey captures the breadth of human expression writ large and writ small. I recommended Kushiel's Dart to fans of epic fantasy; now I'll go one step further and say that even straight up historical fiction fans can find enjoyment here. Carey's skill as a writer is something that transcends genre, and while Kushiel's Chosen is fantasy in name, it is fantastic by nature.

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My Reviews of Kushiel's Legacy: Feb 25, Fey rated it it was amazing Shelves: The second in the Kushiel's legacy series, continues on exactly where the first novel left off. Phedre no Delaunay, now the comtesse de Montreve, comfortably living in her country home with Joscelin and her three chevaliers, and spending most of her time learning Habiru, in the hopes of discovering the key to freeing Hyacinth from the yeshuite curse.

But then a parcel comes from Melisande Sharizhai - Phedre's sangoire cloak - and there is only one way to interpret it; Melisande's games of politic The second in the Kushiel's legacy series, continues on exactly where the first novel left off. But then a parcel comes from Melisande Sharizhai - Phedre's sangoire cloak - and there is only one way to interpret it; Melisande's games of politics and treachery and not yet finished, and she is inviting Phedre back into the game if she dares.

And so Phedre goes back to the city, to take up service of Naamah again, to become again a courtesan and a spy. The first and greatest mystery being, who was it that aided Melisande's escape from Troyes le mont, and how far will Phedre need to go to find out. I have to say, I enjoyed this one just as much, if not more than Kushiel's Dart. Near the end of the previous I was almost lulled into thinking there would be no more adventure for Phedre, that she was settling down with Joscelin, and that would be it. But of course the adventure was far from over.

And really what an amazing adventure this time.. So many new lands, cultures and people in this one. Which only makes me wonder how far she'd have to travel in the third book in order to beat it! As in the previous book there was no mercy for the heart, I believe Carey is one of those writers that will ruthlessly kill off beloved characters if it's important to the plot.

She makes me cry so much, but I'm masochistic and I love a good cry, I can't help myself. Not telling who of course, you'll have to read it yourself and suffer the same as I did! Some of the aspects that interest me most about this series is the mythology and the magic. At times you could almost believe it's a fantasy world without magic, just myths and legends for them, and then - as with the master of the straits in the 1st book - something just jumps out at you to show you that magic can touch Phedre's world.

And if magic can happen.. I am still hoping for this mythology to go further. If you were one of those, like I was, worried that the 2nd book would not live up to the 1st book.. And now I've proved to myself that it's just as good, and I've got this review out of the way - my personal rule I am now so so ready to jump into the 3rd book!! See my other reviews of Kushiel's Legacy: Jul 24, Cathie rated it liked it Recommends it for: This is the 2nd book in the series and while good and true to the story line, it just seemed to drag on.

It's a chunkster and I probably wasn't in the right head frame to be reading something that required me to remember a lot of names, places and previous story lines. Jacqueline Carey is an excellent writer. It is her beautiful writing style that kept me going with this one.

This is part of an epic long series 7 books in all, I believe? I still loved the story line of the main character, but at times it just seemed to take forever to get the end spot. I might pick up the 3rd in the series the ending to Phedre's part in the story line but it will be sometime in the future. Mar 16, Sarah Mac rated it it was amazing Shelves: Another beautifully written epic fantasy.

Kushiel's Chosen picks up where Kushiel's Dart left off. She doesn't have to become involved, but she makes that choice -- the same way she submits to a patron's whims, but on a larger political scale. Likewise, the intrigue in this book has a more perso Another beautifully written epic fantasy. Likewise, the intrigue in this book has a more personal note.

Phedre is that rare breed in fantasy -- a strong female character who isn't a warrior, or even royalty. I can't help thinking this author must have devoured bodice rippers when she was younger. So many heroines these days are ashamed of having sexual thoughts, let alone sleeping with men who aren't the primary hero. Where's the fun in that? Why is larger-than-life such a dirty concept these days?! The written world needs more Phedres, dammit. View all 5 comments. Dec 05, Megan Baxter rated it really liked it. When I wrote my first review, I wondered for a while if this was really fantasy - or rather, said that up until one particular thing happened, there was nothing that made this particularly fantasy in terms of magic.

I'm not sure what genre non-magical but certainly not Earth-based historical fiction would fall under. The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here. In the meantime, you can read t When I wrote my first review, I wondered for a while if this was really fantasy - or rather, said that up until one particular thing happened, there was nothing that made this particularly fantasy in terms of magic.

In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook Apr 14, Bibliophile rated it it was ok Shelves: Kushiel's Chosen was my least favorite of Jacqueline Carey's trilogy featuring the anguisette Phedre no Delaunay. In this novel, the action shifts from Terre d'Ange to Carey's version of Venice La Serenissima so Phedre is free to display her snobbery and chauvinism to a grating degree no one else is as beautiful as Angelines, no other place is as lovely, cultured, fashionable or interesting, no other language is as beautiful, yadda, yadda, yadda.

By the time I'd read pages of this, I want Kushiel's Chosen was my least favorite of Jacqueline Carey's trilogy featuring the anguisette Phedre no Delaunay. By the time I'd read pages of this, I wanted shut Phedre up in La Dolorosa myself just for being annoying! Unfortunately, I think I like Melisande Shahrizai a lot more than I like Phedre or Phedre's boss Ysandre in this and I think Melisande does have a point about how she'd make a fine queen! Plus, there was not enough Joscelin in this for my tastes! I'm always a little weirded out in these books, by the way, by the co-existence of Bronze Age England with Renaissance or even 18th century?

Lastly, Carey overuses certain words and phrases that drive me crazy: And yet, go figure, I still thoroughly enjoyed this trilogy and loved Kushiel's Avatar. That's the only certain thing I can tell you to be honest. Even in the first book I had liked her less than the so-called secondary characters and she certainly didn't do anything to "redeem" herself in my eyes this time around. It's not a matter of her beliefs or her personality, but simply of taste: I do not feel like I can care for her nor she makes me want to.

This brings me to an interesting at least for me lol point. Carey's prose makes me think of Rothfuss'. P but they do have in common a beautiful prose and a first person point of view, since it's the main character that tells their own story. Not to mention how vain they both are. In both cases I felt like the main characters kept pointing out their abilities way too much for me to actually like them.

Kushiel's Chosen (Kushiel's Legacy : Phedre Trilogy, book 2) by Jacqueline Carey

Does this make sense? She knew that Joscelin's would not understand her choices and while I liked that she got that, I did not like all those talks about "the pains of the soul" that brought her pleasure. I do not care you're Kushiel's Dart, you do not hurt my puppy and be happy because you're hurting him and yourself in the process. Joscelin is precious, you little bastard. Also, if I hear the sentence "the training of the Night Court is so blah blah" another time I'll kill someone.

I liked the plot. I think it was more predictable this time around, because in Kushiel's Dart I was surprised by pretty much everything, while this time I could tell what Melisande was plotting, but I think it was a bit more If I had some problems with the pace of book 1 I found book 2 much more refined and with more balance to its different parts at least. I missed some characters. Does that make sense? I liked her in this installment and I liked her clever games. I do not think there are many villains I loathe and love as much as I do when it comes to Melisande.

I guess it's partly due to how well developed her character is and also to how much she outshined the main character in this case. Overall I liked Kushiel's Dart more, especially when it comes to the characters and the intrigue, but I did find Chosen to be better written and more polished. View all 8 comments. This second book of the series follows broadly the pattern of the first.

(My) Kushiel's Legacy Cast

We have a first part - almost one third of the book - especialy sexually charged where we are watching the political controversies and the various scheems that are knitting in Terre d'Ange, followed by a second where we go out on the road and wander around the world where the series takes place - who is essentially the world that we are living quite In spite o This second book of the series follows broadly the pattern of the first. In spite of all these similarities, I believe that there will be several differences, and I dare to say that in this second book we are witnessing an upgrading as the writer becomes more daring - and I am not referring to the erotic scenes that are just a little more But this that fortunately for us not change at all is the amazing writing of Jacqueline Carey that remains beautiful and touching.

In this book, indeed, she is called to pass a test as the plot itself makes our dear Phedre wonder about many things as he goes through emotionally painful moments. This test, therefore, she passes it perfectly as she offers us with the description of very touching moments. That, you see, is also the main concern of this book: Difficult question, as you understand.

So the conclusion that comes out is that we again have an excellent result though I feel that this second part is slightly inferior to the former. Several times I felt that the writer repeats himself, recycling many of the ideas of the first book, while there are some excesses. Nevertheless for the second time Jacqueline Carey swept me away so much that I could not put anything less than five stars. I was almost scared to read this, because I was just sure it wouldn't be able to measure up to Kushiel's Dart.

If I'd known how wrong I was, I wouldn't have waited two months to pick it up! I probably won't be able to wait even a week to start the third one. So often, books in a series have different vibes, and the feelings you get while reading them are so varied that its hard to consider them connected. Not so with these, Kushiel's Chosen was very much a continuation of the first, and I can't r I was almost scared to read this, because I was just sure it wouldn't be able to measure up to Kushiel's Dart.

Not so with these, Kushiel's Chosen was very much a continuation of the first, and I can't really give it any higher praise. I picked up where I left off, feeling the exact same way about all the characters and immediately picked up my deep emotional connections to most of them. Carey has such an awesome way of writing things.

You spend the first pages give or take knowing something awful is coming, and to some degree I'm sure everyone tries to figure out what that might be I loved that about Dart, and loved it in this one also. Its also a great mark of her writing abilities that she can display such a wide emotional range in these characters. Seduction and sex are these peoples' occupations as homage to their gods, and as such the acts are displayed as duty, not pleasure.

But, when the emotions are real, such beauty and love shine through. I can't recommend this series enough to the people willing to take a risk on such an original and fascinating storyline. Jun 18, Jeannette rated it really liked it Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.

The second book of the Kushiel trilogy is not quite as rough to get through as the first one. I had a hard time at the beginning personally, but I think that is due to the fact that I hated how Phedre and Joscelin tortured each other for no good reason. Seriously, by the end, they realized no reason was good enough either - especially with Phedre's penchant for getting into trouble.

Anyway, the story itself is fantastic in its detail and pacing. Carey truly knows how to create a mul The second book of the Kushiel trilogy is not quite as rough to get through as the first one. Carey truly knows how to create a multi-faceted world. More intrigue, more politics, more characters with whom I'd love to sit down and have dinner. The loss of any of those characters is crushing, and I think I'll be very emotional to not have Fortun and Remy in the next installment I couldn't stand them not being in the second half of this book.

I was a bit frustrated by the ending and Melisande once again escaping justice, but I suppose there's still another book, and Phedre needs wits that match her own. Overall, a worthy second installment and I'm looking forward to the third.

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But hopefully next time I won't get to the climax at midnight and end up reading until 2: In many ways this is the "hardest" for me to re-read because I find the first half just a bit tedious with all the stregazza politics, but the 2nd half more than makes up for it! I read this in a day. And it leaves me wondering how in the world I thought her first book was average.

I am already a few hundred pages into 3, and am very glad that she writes very long books, and that there are 4 awaiting me. May 23, Benedict rated it it was amazing Shelves: So, while I don't plan to give away any major plot twists, I'm reviewing the second in a series, so spoilers, of course, if you haven't read the first, and probably light spoilers here anyway. I'll note that my copy of this arrived while I was 18 chapters into the first Game of Thrones book. Carey's prose is so much richer, her characters so much more complex, her paragraphs so much more unified-in-a-single-thought okay, that last is just uncharitable; sorry to Martin.

Sincerely, So, while I don't plan to give away any major plot twists, I'm reviewing the second in a series, so spoilers, of course, if you haven't read the first, and probably light spoilers here anyway. Sincerely, though, it was a breath of fresh air to pick this up.

I'll continue the Martin comparison a moment longer: Kushiel's Chosen is character driven and has a single protagonist; part of her agony and the reader's is not knowing what's going on with the other characters, and it's well-done. Unexpected things happen, but surprise is not the engine that moves the plot. If she misses something, she does it in the same way.

If she makes a promise or breaks one, commits to someone or holds them at distance, suffers or rejoices, she does it as herself. Five star rating just for pulling that off with such a flourish. The religious commitments in this novel are deeper than the first. The characters' traits are also more compelling to them, but without being at all charicaturish. It's fun to watch her grow. It's also fun to watch the other major characters grow: Sadly, the sex and exploration of sensitive religious topics keep this pretty firmly beyond most young adult readers.

I heartily recommend the book to lovers of fantasy, epic, Tolkien, space opera it's a different genre, but you'll find some familiar elements , and historical fiction. There's just enough magic, the religious landscape is incredibly well-developed, and the pacing's a lot of fun. I certainly intend to finish the series. One note about that religious landscape -- Christ is known to have been the Messiah in this fantasy world's history, but there's also magic, other gods whose existence is left ambivalent but pretty-heartily endorsed, and the main character's national religious heritage is descended as are the citizens of that nation from angels who rebelled against God's disowning of a second son begotten accidentally of earth through the wounds of the Messiah.

Carey doesn't fling this in your face, but if it's going to make you queasy, you're forewarned.

Hardback Editions

Nov 04, The W rated it liked it. Your sequel really should always be better due to your readers knowing the characters and what the world is about so you, the writer, can spend more time on the rest of your story. She screws over Joscelin and continues throughout. Basically, she was selfish which is pretty annoying. Carey ha W Rating: Carey having Joscelin scowling the entire half the book was tiring. Then, she takes a turn. It was pretty obvious but take what you can get. Throw in pirates, blood debts, death, and reunion and you have a decent romance novel with hints of fantasy.

Poor Hyacinthe was only a mention here and there. Little done to fix that situation.

Kushiel's Legacy

This does not make me more confident in the Hyacinthe block theory with Carey. Carey better put some effort in the next book for him. Apparently with ten years of time they have now they would possibly find something. So, the last pages save the last 50 or so were decent.

She had the intrigue and issues with the whole lower Europe. The pirates were a nice touch. Many setbacks and dramas but all in all the story got going, and at a good pace. Then the last bit. What a huge let down. I'll leave it at that. Just jarringly poor and weak. This huge novel with massive plot and I said I would leave it at that.

This novel was less than the first. The continuing characters were weaker. The ending was the biggest "meh" of it all. Yet, I will continue. The characters are still good and there is still much to be done. Mar 18, Jamie Collins rated it liked it Shelves: This is almost as good as the first book, with the same lovely overwrought prose that I am finding quite absorbing.

Unsatisfied with her triumph of the previous novel, our heroine travels to a foreign land seeking a traitor who escaped justice.

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Jul 21, Mei rated it really liked it. I finished this one really fast for me at least and delighted at some of the new developments. With that said, it wasn't quite up to the first in terms of quality. I found it lacking a bit, but the world building is still stunning and it's nice to read a fantasy that focuses more on the court intrigue and not the battles. View all 11 comments. Nov 08, Ellen Gail rated it it was amazing Shelves: I asked for it in my review of Kushiel's Dart and book two delivered!

In these kinds of epic fantasies, I find those so helpful. When I got to the end of the chapter that revealed a particularly big bombshell, view spoiler [the one where Melisande Shahrizai is reveale [Mild non-specific spoilers for Kushiel's Dart below] Top 5 Reasons I Loved Kushiel's Chosen 1 The first thing I see when I open the book is a map and a cast of characters sorted by location. It doesn't get all plot-twisty just for the sake of it, or try for shock value. Characters aren't sacrificed to the alter of plot. Just to swords and various other sharp things.

It's so refreshing to read a book with very little sexual stigma. Sometimes with women, sometimes with men, and sometimes she's compensated for it. She has a main love interest, but she isn't monogamous. And she's perfectly okay with this. There's no talk about purity or shame. There is no shame in being a Servant of Naamah nor an anguissette. We are D'Angeline, and we revere such things. Scorned by his grandfather, the One God , Elua wandered the Earth with eight companion angels.

After years of wandering, Elua and his companions settled in the land that would become Terre d'Ange. Elua espoused the precept "Love as thou wilt" and he and his companions inter-bred with the native populace, creating the D'Angeline people. Elua himself is a cross between Dionysus and a wandering fertility god associated with nature, love, and liberty.

Kushiel's Legacy is set about one thousand years after the time of Elua, and the D'Angeline people worship him and his eight companions as gods. They live by his precept, "Love as thou wilt," and, since Naamah sold her body at times to support Elua during their wanderings, consider prostitution to be a sacred service. This service is regulated by its own guild. Furthermore, to serve in the Court of Night-Blooming Flowers , composed of several Houses, each with their own interpretation of Naamah's reasons for prostituting herself, is regarded as the highest pinnacle in Naamah's Service.

Terre d'Ange is divided into seven provinces, each with a companion as its patron deity. Cassiel, who eschewed mortal love and never fully rejected the One God, is the only companion without a province. The Cassiline Brotherhood , however, follows the ways and philosophy of Cassiel and have a prominent role in d'Angeline society.

Paperback Editions

Kushiel's Chosen has ratings and reviews. mark said: I was waffling between 3 I asked for it in my review of Kushiel's Dart and book two delivered!. Editorial Reviews. somiquvevuda.gq Review. In this engrossing adult fantasy tale, the fascinating Book 2 of 3 in Kushiel's Legacy (3 Book Series).

At the beginning of the series relations are generally good with Terre d'Ange's neighboring countries of Aragonia , Caerdicca Unitas , and distant Khebbel-im-Akkad. Skaldia , however, has long sought to conquer the D'Angelines. They also have good relations with Alba and Eire though scarce given the impact of the Master of the Straits.

The third trilogy within the Kushiel Universe follows Moirin, a half-d'Angeline and half- Alban descendant of House Courcel , approximately years after Kushiel's Legacy. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. Learn how and when to remove these template messages.

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